Midsummer meanderings

With our holiday plans scuppered and the Asturian borders opened, along with the rest of Spain, to visitors once again (she says wearing very worried eyebrows) we decided this would be a good time to get out and do a few walks before the main tourist season takes off. Not that it’s ever really that busy here, but we are generally very spoilt in having trails and beaches pretty much to ourselves for most of the year and it’s all relative. Once August arrives, we are happy simply to stay at home.

Midsummer garden

Our first idea was to go back to walk the Ruta de las Xanas which we did with Sam and Adrienne back in January, but instead of risking a possible mugging by the huge mountain hound at the top of the gorge, we thought we would forgo the picnic and treat ourselves to lunch in the village bar ~ and as that is something we rarely do, it really would be a treat indeed. However, having checked online we discovered that it was closed for the festival of San Juan. Ah, okay.

We had a fantastic day out on the Ruta de las Xanas with Adrienne and Sam earlier this year.

Unlike in neighbouring Galicia, June 24th is not a public holiday in Asturias but obviously, as in this case, individuals can choose to mark it if they wish. In many parts of Spain, the night of the 23rd sees huge celebrations where people come together to dance, light bonfires on beaches and party throughout the night. Although as the Feast of Saint John it’s nominally a Christian festival, the celebrations themselves are based on much older pagan ways and share many similarities with other cultural acknowledgements of the summer solstice around the globe.

Time for Plan B and we decided to try a new walk in the neighbouring municipality of Tineo, one we’ve been meaning to do for some time now. As the crow flies, it’s not that far from home but there is no easy or direct route to the starting point so we suspected the journey on twisty mountain roads could end up being as interesting as the walk itself. It certainly was, and the scenery was spectacular, especially a valley filled with white, fluffy cloud; I hope I never become immune to natural beauty such as this.

There was no cloud at the start of our walk, just bright sunshine and a brilliant blue sky that suggested the day would be much hotter than forecast. The scenery was stunning, the trees all decked out in their full summer foliage and the dusky mountains rolling away into the distance.

The path soon turned down a greener than green lane which looked like it was going to develop into a really pleasant hike until some way down, we hit a major snag: the path was completely overgrown. Now, I realise that I might sound very hypocritical having recently moaned about the verges being cut (on which note, the morning’s journey through verges full of wild flowers and insect life had restored my faith a good deal, the strimming obsession seems to be very local to our valley)! One of the results of the COVID-19 situation is that many trails and picnic sites haven’t been maintained as they normally would have been and this left us with a problem. As country people we are prepared to wade through vegetation, squelch through mud, paddle across rivers or clamber over or under fallen trees, but waist-high nettles in shorts? Nope, not doing it . . . especially as it was early on in an eleven-kilometre circular walk and who knows what the rest might be like?

The path didn’t stay this clear for long!

Back to the car and on to Plan C. By this point of our days out, things often start to get a little needy and this one was no exception. Roger, who had been up since cockerel o’clock and run a half marathon distance before I’d even started my breakfast, was ready for his lunch; I, on the other hand, having lounged about drinking far too many mugs of tea and coffee was jiggling from foot to foot in need of a secluded spot for a ‘wild wee.’ We decided the best course of action was to head to nearby Navelgas and have our picnic in a shady woodland site next to the river. I love spots like these, for me they are pure Asturias ~ especially with the sound of cowbells ringing from the meadow beyond.

Navelgas is a lovely little town in a very pretty spot; in certain parts of the UK, it’s the sort of place that would be heaving with visitors, full of tea shops, arty boutiques and hiking and camping outlets. Instead, it’s full of friendly people quietly living their lives in the midst of beautiful scenery . . . and not a postcard or cream tea in sight!

It’s also the starting point for several good walks, some of which we’d already done so opting to try a new one, the Senda Verde de Brezo, we headed out of town along the river.

The route climbed steeply through woodland carpeted with wild strawberries, where the evocative spicy scent of warm pine took me straight back to the Canadian Rockies, albeit without the added excitiment of meeting a black bear around the corner!

There is something so special about woodland at this time of year, with the shafts of high sunlight piercing the leaf canopy and the air ringing with the incessant sound of birdsong. It was truly magical.

Further on, and we emerged from the trees to more open country and another path where nature was doing its own thing but thankfully not in a jungle of nettles this time. There were drifts of cheery yellow St John’s wort everywhere; very fitting given the date, I thought.

The path was still obviously quite passable but the issue with places like this is ticks, which seem to be especially bad this year. I find the best solution is to let another warm-blooded animal (preferably with hairy legs) go on ahead, after which it’s only fair to do some mutual tick-picking in true monkey grooming style!

On reaching the top of the climb, we stood and drank in the wide-reaching views. It never fails to amaze me how we can be looking at mountains higher than Ben Nevis and see farms or even whole village communities perched on top.

Someone with a lot of foresight had placed a bench there so we sat and enjoyed a drink of water, surrounded by the bustling busyness of bees and soporific fluttering of butterflies. Blimey, it was hot!

Given the heat and how much of the day it had taken us to reach this point, we decided not to go right to the end of the walk. Like not climbing to the top of a mountain, this sort of thing never bothers me because it’s about the journey, not the arriving; in fact, sometimes I think doing part of a set trail rather than the whole thing can be more pleasurable and rewarding, especially if a slower pace gives me the chance to really immerse myself and indulge my senses in the surroundings. Retracing our steps through the relative cool of the woodland, I lost myself in awe and wonder at the dancing silhouettes of ancient chestnut trees and the leafy elegance of it all.

Arriving back in Navelgas, we spent a little time looking at the beautiful seventeenth century panera de San Nicolás, draped with dried corn cobs in the traditional fashion. On our way back through the woods, we had collected some huge pine cones to add to the collection of natural ‘finds’ we are incoroporating into the enchanted garden part of our orchard. At first glance, there appeared to be a couple of giant carved ones beneath the panera . . .

. . . but on closer inspection, they turned out to be something quite different! Maybe we should have a go at carving one of these for the garden, too?

Home again, and what seemed to have begun as a bit of a scrappy, stop-go day had turned out to be very enjoyable in a gentle and satisfying way ~ no whizz-bang-pops, no great dramas or challenging paths, just a good walk in a beautiful spot and fabulous weather. Well, I say fabulous but nature had other ideas; no sooner were we home, than the blue sky disappeared in a tumult of storm clouds, the darkened valley became moody and atmospheric and the thunder rolled in. As the first fat spots of rain darkened the terrace slates, I reflected on the incredible range of midsummer skies we had experienced all in the space of one day. So fickle. So beautiful. So Asturias. 🙂

Just enough time to enjoy a glass of wine on the terrace before the heavens opened!