Simply living

‘Could there be anything better than living simply and taking it easy?’ Masanobu Fukuoka, The One-Straw Revolution

We have never set out to be self-sufficient in an extreme ‘Good Life’ sort of way; there are too many commodities we need but can’t produce ourselves, and  – to be completely honest – there are also things we love and wouldn’t like to live without (coffee and tea, for instance). Our aim is to live simply, walking lightly on the Earth and living gently from the land as much as we possibly can. We are happy to have just what we need and no more, and that is a lovely place to be. Neither of us is shy of hard work and yet somehow even on the busiest of days, spending our time on tasks that support our lifestyle can feel exactly like taking it easy! What’s more, the freedom from rigid timetables and responsibilities allows us to take time ‘off’ and enjoy the beautiful place in which we are so lucky to live.

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Walking the coastpath last weekend . . . 
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. . . then up into the mountains.

In cooler months, the woodburning stove  – aka ‘The Beast’ – is absolutely central to our lifestyle. We had hoped  to keep the original stove here but it proved so inefficient and unreliable in our first winter that replacing it was the only choice and once again we opted for a Nordica.

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This is an Italian make, at the ‘budget’ end of things compared perhaps to better known makes of kitchen ranges but we rate it very highly – so much so that this is the third house where we have installed one. Nothing clever or fancy, it simply burns wood in the form of good old-fashioned logs . . . and here is an area where we can be self-sufficient. Half our land here is forest, about four acres (1.6 hectares) of mixed woodland which contains a lifetime’s sustainable supply of logs. We can take what we need through careful woodland management, there is no question of plundering or destroying; all it requires is careful planning and a lot of work! The wood needs to be hauled home, cut into lengths, split into logs then stacked in a stone shed to season until dry enough to burn.

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This is an ongoing process, always looking ahead. This year we have the added bonus of an enormous pile of old timbers which were removed from the house when it was re-roofed in the summer.  We could have paid several hundred euros to have it thrown in a skip and taken away but what would the point of that been? A few days’ hard work at the time created the timber mountain outside and Roger’s daily chainsawing session is steadily reducing it to enough logs to see us through one if not two winters.

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The benefits of having the stove are many. Having opted for an open, cabin style-home it heats the entire house; we have a few modern electric radiators for back-up but quite honestly, I doubt they will ever be used. We are toasty with a capital T! We don’t have a tumble drier: 95% of our laundry is dried outside in the fresh air, but a collapsible wooden airer in front of the stove overnight dries or airs anything if we have a run of rainy days. A kettle of water sits permanently on the hob, providing boiling water for tea and coffee, all our washing up and household cleaning purposes. A constantly hot hob and oven mean we can cook as much as we like without having to worry about using the electric cooker efficiently and it is perfect for those things that need long cooking like the batch of marmalade made earlier this week.

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A hot stove in the morning also means we can cook dishes for lunch, a luxury I have really enjoyed since giving up work and being at home – it beats a lunchbox any day! In the photo of the stove above, there is a pan of lentils cooking as a base for a lunchtime salad and on the worktop next to it, two trays of dough rising for ciabatta loaves.

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Gardening and growing our own food have always been important parts of our life and something I find difficult to regard as work; I love being out of doors with my hands in the soil and the benefits of fresh, organic produce with zero food miles are priceless. Sarah and I often agree that there is a lot of fun to be had ‘foraging’ in your own garden as even at this time of year when it is perhaps at its emptiest, it is amazing what can be gathered. With this in mind, I set off to pick what I could find to go with those lentils, thinking probably a small bulb of fennel and a few herbs would be it . . .

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What a lovely little haul! There was fennel (the smaller bulbs are starting to go to seed now so need eating quickly), mizuna and baby komatsuna from self-set plants, peas ‘three ways’ (a few pods of sweet baby peas, small pods to eat whole and pea shoots), mint and chives for herbal flavour and calendula and borage flowers for colour. Mixed with lentils, salt, pepper, olive oil, grated lemon zest and a squeeze of lemon juice, what a splendid salad they made.

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Making stock is a way of life for us and here again the stove comes into its own. We bought a stainless steel stockpot over 20 years ago and it is one of the best investments ever, we have used it so much (not just for stock – that marmalade was made in it, too). No bits of meat or fish bone, skin, scraps or shell (in the case of seafood) leave the kitchen without first having been boiled and simmered into a gorgeous, flavoursome stock. For us this is not just about creating the base for future meals but also doing full honour to the animals we have eaten. There is simply no waste. The same is true of vegetable stock, so easy to make and a world away from anything that comes from a cube. The beauty of it is that any bits and scraps of veg can be used so it’s a good way of using up anything that’s past its best and, as the finished stock is strained, the veg can go in skins and all. Here is the pot I made this week:

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A scrappy onion, a couple of garlic cloves, rainbow chard (stalks that had self-pruned), the last few carrots from our late crop now suffering from rootfly, some leafing celery, a tiny leek that came out when I was lifting bigger ones, a couple of definitely-past-their-best parsley stalks and salt and peppercorns yielded three litres of delicious stock, some of which went straight into vegetable soup, the rest into the freezer for future meals. Really, this is something from nothing!

On which subject . . . we are trying hard to get as close to zero waste as possible; it’s not easy, but making compost has again always been a way of life to us, and a great way to recycle organic matter into (eventually) more food. I’m not keen on having a kitchen compost bin which always seems to go slimy, so we use a large plastic mixing bowl instead and empty it daily. I don’t think our current compost heap would win any prizes at it is not very pretty and breaks several golden composting rules: it sits directly on concrete, it isn’t covered, there is only one heap rather than two or three in rotation, we only turn it once a year and we just throw on whatever needs composting rather than any strict green / brown layering. Oh dear!

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Well, the proof of the pudding and all that: I turned the heap a couple of days ago and found many, many barrow loads of the richest, crumbliest, most wonderful compost ever – enough, in fact to mulch the whole of the veg patch currently fallow (most of it) with plenty left to dig into the area where a polytunnel will soon be going up. I think we’ll just stick with the rule breaking, it seems to be working a treat.

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Back to the idea of living simply and taking it easy. A very rainy day saw me looking for an indoor activity and I had just the thing which certainly felt like relaxation. Some months ago, I crocheted a couple of dishcloths from scrap cotton yarn and they have proved to be the best things ever (I realise sounding enthusiastic about dishcloths might seem a bit sad, but I am a simple soul). Given that we don’t have a dishwasher and all our washing up is done by hand, they have taken quite a bashing without showing any signs of wear and tear at all. I throw them into a hot wash with sheets and teatowels and back they come, ready for another go. On the strength of this, I decided to make some more, this time from a slightly heavier cotton: a 100g ball yielded two dishcloths and a larger floorcloth. While I was at it, I dug out some more scrap cotton and knitted a purple tawashi knot scrubbie to use as a scourer (thank you to Sonja for the idea!).

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Simple things and happy days. There really isn’t anything better! 🙂

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Perfect Planning

The photos in this post are some I have taken over the last couple of weeks. I hope you enjoy their simple seasonal beauty.

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It’s funny the things I miss sometimes. We have hardly any post here: being totally paperless is great for the environment but I do miss a pile of old envelopes for making lists on! I like lists, I like lists of lists and above all, I love a good plan.

If you are considering making some changes to your life in order to simplify your lifestyle or give you more time to do the things you want to then starting with a Grand Plan is vitally important. We didn’t suddenly wake up one morning, pack a van and disappear; our decision to downsize and drop out was made years ago and involved some very careful planning and decision-making in order to make it happen. Even if the change you are looking for is relatively small – say, making time to sit down in peace and quiet once a day, getting rid of unwanted clutter or learning to cook simple but delicious meals -then a plan is still a helpful and powerful tool. The British armed forces have a saying known as the Seven Ps: proper prior planning  prevents piss-poor performance. Love it or loathe it, it contains a lot of truth; the better you can make your life plan, the greater chance you will have of realising your goals. So, here are my tips in how to get started.

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You will need pens or pencils and paper – almost certainly something bigger than the back of an envelope! Actually, I always find the bigger the better as it helps me to really focus; we use a flipchart sheet and marker pens in different colours which can be useful for grouping or separating ideas.

Start with your ultimate goal as the title. Remember, this is your dream and only you can make it happen. Making your plan is so exciting because it’s the first step in moving from an abstract idea to something more concrete. Seeing it written down starts to make it feel possible and real. Go on, smile – this really could happen!

You know that awful job interview question, ‘So where do you see yourself in five years’ time?’ Well, it’s so much more fun when you are asking yourself. Timescale is very important: how long do you realistically believe it will take to achieve your goal? Write it down, underline it, circle it . . . that’s what you will be working towards.

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Now split your page in half. On one side, make two simple but comprehensive lists of the pros and cons of making your life change. Be honest here; it’s less painful to ignore the cons but they are important factors in the equation. In the same way, don’t ignore what might seem abstract or even daft ideas in the pros list: being happier or less tired or healthier are important – in fact, possibly just the very reasons behind wanting to make the changes in your life.

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Next, assign everything in your two lists a weighting to show their relative importance to you. This can be a bit tricky so take your time and again, be honest and realistic. It might be more attractive to focus on the good bits but things like financial concerns can’t be ignored; it’s crucially important not to risk financial disaster or the loss of your home. Being brutally honest at this stage could save a lot of heartache later on. What you should see developing is a clear set of reasons why you should pursue your dream and a list of the possible negative factors that could affect your decision.

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On the other half of your page, write down everything you would need to do in order to achieve your goal. What goes here will depend entirely on you, your situation and your dream. If finding a few minutes in the morning to read or exercise before going to work is your aim, then organising clothes and lunchbox the evening before and setting the alarm for an earlier time may be pretty much all you need to do; if you plan to sell everything and travel the world in a camper van, then your list is likely to be a fair bit longer! That’s fine – it’s your list and it doesn’t matter how short or long it turns out to be. Don’t forget to add any research that you might need to carry out (we spent a lot of time looking into the cost of living, tax implications and health care insurance abroad) or any new skills you want to acquire (in our case, basic Spanish so we factored in some evening classes before we moved).  What you should find is that pretty much everything in the end will come down to three things: time, money and effort. Once your list is complete, draw lines or arrows to indicate dependencies and make connections as this will help when it comes to sorting out order and timescale. So for instance, we knew that we couldn’t sell our home or move abroad before our youngest child had left home, but it would be possible for one of us to shift from full-time to part-time work several years before then.

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At this point, stop! You’ve worked hard and your head is probably whirling like a squirrel in a cage with the excitement and trepidation of it all. Walk away from your plan and go and do something else: have a walk or run in the fresh air, put the kettle on, watch a film . . .  whatever helps you to relax. Leave your plan in a place where you can clearly see it for several days (that’s the beauty of working on big paper, it’s very visible); visit it often, look over what you’ve written, think and reflect. Is there anything missing or new that you’ve thought of? Add it. Do some things now seem irrelevant or unnecessary? Cross them out. On reflection, could you do things differently or change your timescale? Adjust your ideas.

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Now comes the really exciting bit: creating your Grand Plan! Actually, it’s quite simple, as all you need to do is write a chronological list of everything that needs to happen within your chosen timescale. I like to make a written numbered list whilst Roger prefers to create nifty spreadsheets on the computer. It’s your plan, so do exactly what works for you. The important point to remember in the coming weeks, months or years is that your Grand Plan is a work in progress and as such it is designed to be flexible, not set in stone. If your ideas change as you go along or things take longer than expected to happen or lead in unexpected directions, that’s fine – it’s all part of the process. Even if your plan doesn’t come to fruition or you have to end up altering it or abandoning it in favour of other things, treat it as an interesting exercise and experience. After all, the very fact that you wanted to make it in the first place was a brave and adventurous step in trying to change your life for the better . . . and that’s an amazing and ultimately rewarding thing to do.

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Home, Sweet Home!

What makes a home? For me, it’s always been a place where I live with people I love. I have shared ten homes with Roger – in Cyprus, England, Wales, France and Spain – every home has been different but each time there has been an awareness that we are simply custodians passing through. Even if you live in the same house for your whole life, you are still just a small part of its history, so for me ‘home’ isn’t about the bricks and mortar (or wood, stone, thatch, canvas, whatever) and it certainly isn’t about the ‘stuff’ within. Over the years as our family grew, so did the size of our homes and the amount of possessions needed to fill them; now I am blissfully happy living in a smaller space with the minimum amount of stuff and maximum amount of living! How wonderful to have the time and energy to enjoy simple pleasures and moments every day.

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Moving home might be a pretty stressful and exhausting activity but it’s also a great opportunity to reflect on what we have in our lives and how much of it we actually need. Moving to Spain last year was a huge opportunity for us to reduce our ‘stuff’ and bring only the things we needed and a few bits and pieces that make our house feel like home; it all came down to a transit van, car and two trailers.

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Having reached a point in the renovation and decorating this week where we are finally beginning to see a clean and comfy living space emerge from the chaos, I have spent a happy time rearranging things and unpacking a few bits from the boxes they have been patiently inhabiting for many months. It has given me a chance to look around and reflect on what we chose to keep and why, those special things that make this ‘home.’

First, pictures. We had collected so many pictures, it was ridiculous, especially as I have no idea where most of them came from and if I’m honest I didn’t even like many of them. I suppose it’s just habit – there’s a wall, better hang something on it. Why? I actually prefer lots of empty space on walls – there’s no need to clutter them – with just one or two special pictures which will make far more impact. So, just two have gone up on our kitchen/living room walls this week and I think that will do for now. At the kitchen end is a cross-stitch calendar I made many, many years ago when I obviously had far more patience and better eyesight. It was my ‘holiday’ activity, something to work on in quiet moments when the children were happily occupied or settled into bed; it took me years to complete and I have to say more of those stitches were made in a wet tent than I care to remember . . . but still, there are a lot of happy memories in there and I also love the simplicity of the pictures, all seasonal wild flowers, weeds and leaves.

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At the opposite end of the room is a picture of one of the homes we passed through, painted for us by my father-in-law and framed by him, too, in a solid wooden frame. I love the bright colours and slightly abstract style which seem to suit our mountain house down to the ground.

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Just look at that pile of fruit beneath the picture! Healthy eating has always been central to our lives and fruit is something we have never stinted on (although we only ever buy what’s fresh, local wherever possible, seasonal and usually on special offer. December strawberries? Never). We are so blessed here in being able to pick fresh fruit every month of the year; we are currently enjoying the last of the figs and pears in anticipation of the kiwi glut. We have enough pears in storage to last all winter and a freezer full of peaches, but we still supplement our homegrown produce with bought fruits in order to enjoy a wide variety. I was so thrilled to see the citrus season well and truly under way this week and of course we are lucky to live in a country that does them rather well! The persimmon (kaki in Spanish) are also fantastic and so big that we can happily share one. Anyway, back to special things: the turned wooden fruit bowl on the left was made by Roger at school and the bowl on the right was a gift from my brother after a trip to Morocco. I love them both and it’s a pleasure to fill them . . . and then munch my way through their delicious contents.

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Staying with Morocco, one of our most loved and most used pieces of kitchen equipment is a tagine (well, in fact we have two, both gifts from special people). We love this style of one-pot cooking, it is so efficient and a fantastic way of making small amounts of meat or fish go a long way and using whatever vegetables are to hand. A road trip to Morocco is definitely on our wish list (one day . . . ), I would love to see and sample all those wonderful sacks of spices first hand. In the meantime, we spent a lovely time making some preserved lemons this week. These are the easiest things on earth to make and bring a wonderful flavour to so many dishes. Note the smart new chopping board, made from the piece of  beechblock cut out of a worktop to fit the sink. Waste not, want not! Roger has treated it with tung oil which is a great non-toxic ‘feed’ for wood and now it is set for many years of serious food preparation.

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Sticking with the woodwork, Roger has also recycled some scrap wood into a nifty wine rack to fill a useless pace between a cupboard and the stove; each slot holds two bottles and in such a warm spot, it should keep the Rioja at just the right temperature.

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What a very happy time I had hauling a couple of boxes in from the barn and filling our empty bookshelf once again. This is our entire collection of non-fiction reading material, including almost a shelf and a half of recipe books (yes, we love cooking!). So many of these books were gifts, so many of them are well-thumbed and dog-eared from years of use.

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They are like old friends; what should have taken no more than twenty minutes from start to finish ended up being an hour of browsing happiness – gardening, self-sufficiency, spinning and dyeing, herbal medicine, quilting, Spanish study, travel, birds and beasts, flowers and fungi . . . I was completely lost in other worlds. Funny what little bits fell out of them, too: recipes scribbled on old envelopes, quilting templates traced onto greaseproof paper, a pile of ivy leaves I must have pressed for making seasonal cards and decorations. I was truly thrilled to be reunited with my favourite non-fiction book ever, The Therapeutic Garden by Donald Norfolk. I first borrowed this book from the library years and years ago; after the sixth time, I thought maybe I should buy my own copy! I have read it at least once a year ever since and  – even though I can probably quote paragraphs verbatim – I never tire of it. This is not a gardening book but rather a gentle argument for the benefits of humans spending their time in a garden, exercising, breathing deeply, relaxing, connecting with nature, nuturing, eating, socialising, loving and laughing. It typifies so much that I believe in and many of the quotations are from or about people I admire, such as Henry David Thoreau. Happy, happy days . . . I’m reading it once again.

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Now that mug of coffee brings to mind another little thing that makes me feel at home; it’s a silly thing, really, but that’s the point – home should be about those little special bits and pieces. I am a great tea drinker; I like a cup of good coffee as you can see from the picture above (and I have been known to enjoy the occasional glass of red wine!) but tea is my favourite tipple. Roger doesn’t like tea so it’s a pleasure I enjoy all on my own,  but I do have to admit to being a bit of a tea snob. I really can’t get with the whole dunking a teabag in a cup thing; sorry, but I like my tea (a rich malty Assam being my first choice) to be made in a warmed pot and brewed properly for several minutes. So, here is my little one person pot and the tea cosy I made years ago to keep it snug during those all important brewing moments.

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I love this tea cosy because it was made completely from scraps of fabric and wadding left over from a quilting project and a few odd buttons I’d collected over the years. I used a pair of compasses to construct a hexagon template on the back of an old cereal packet and stitched the whole thing by hand – I do have a sewing machine but there was something so lovely about working tiny stitches with a needle and thread and creating something out of nothing.  As I said, a silly thing really, but I love it.

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On a similar theme, left to my own devices for three weeks in May I had a lot of fun messing about with yarn. One of my projects was to design and make some bunting from scrap yarn to hang above the bedroom window. Our windows here are very small and all have built-in blinds or shutters so there is no need for curtains but I wanted something simple and pretty just to liven the space up a bit. Decorating done and hooks found, it was time to hang the bunting at last.

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With the ‘heavy’ building work done and space opening up in the house, I decided it was time to blow the cobwebs off another old friend and bring it in out of storage. Oh, I am so happy to have this back in my life!

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A good polish for the wood and dubbin for the leather and the rickety old thing was back in action once more, although it’s so long since I’ve spun anything that I felt a bit like a learner all over again. Never mind, I have a couple of skeins of Jacobs wool to work on over winter which will hopefully be transformed into a Very Important Bear for our grandson William.

Finally, the washing line. Now I know this might seem a bit of an odd choice but I love to see a line of washing blowing in the wind; to me it is such an important part of our home and I love to peg the laundry out then bring it in dry and sweet-smelling once the wind and sun have done their business, all for free.  We do have a bit of a problem here with a complete lack of flat land so instead of one long line and a prop, we have two shorter ones; as you can see, it’s a constant battle trying to find enough drying space between the fig tree and kiwi.

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No problem. For me, the promise of snuggling down in those sheets so soft and scented with fresh air is one of life’s great pleasures. Simple, yes. Homely, definitely. . . but then, that’s the very point, isn’t it? 🙂

 

 

 

 

It’s not about ‘where?’

With the nights drawing in, we are spending at least some time indoors before bed each evening and that has been a good excuse to dig out my patchwork blanket and work some more squares. Who needs television? 🙂 It is such a simple and gentle activity giving my mind ample opportunity to wander; it was during one such ramble that I realised in many ways this blanket project exemplifies everything that is good and central to our way of life.

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I love making things from yarn: I have knitted since I was a child and in more recent years I’ve also developed a passion for spinning and dyeing my own wool. I had dabbled in crochet here and there but had never really cracked it for all the usual reasons – too busy, too tired, life too full of more important things to be done. This year it has been such a treat to finally find the time to have another go and I have had so much fun making colourful bits and pieces for the new babies in my life. I can’t describe how much pleasure these simple, creative activities have given me.

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The idea for my patchwork blanket was born from my natural inclination not to waste. Several biggish projects have left me with a good quantity of leftover yarn, a resource that has been manufactured, transported and paid for; to my mind, it would be a crime to do nothing with it. So, using the most basic of equipment which I’ve had for years (crochet hook, wool needle, scissors) I’m spending happy times with scraps of yarn, making a practical and colourful all-purpose blanket which I hope will have a busy future. When I started it, I deliberately excluded the hot colours and screaming pinks but I wasn’t too many squares in before I invited them back  – the blanket was looking a bit too harmonious and sophisticated for my liking. I want a rowdy carnival of colour and clashes to make me smile!

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Another thought that has occurred to me as I have been happily hooking away is a point I need to make very clearly before I go too much further: this blog is not designed to be a guide to country living. Yes, we live in a very rural spot so obviously many of the experiences I write about and the photos I include will reflect that, but we haven’t moved out from a town or city to the countryside in order to live our simple way of life; we’re country born and bred and we’ve always lived out in the sticks. We’ve had several lucrative urban job offers over the years but we’ve consciously avoided the big bucks and bright lights because we preferred to stay in familiar territory and raise our family in the country. My point is, though, that everything I believe constitutes simple and happy living can just as easily be practised and enjoyed in an urban setting – in fact, some aspects are probably easier (rural life doesn’t come without its downside). Take my crochet blanket: it could be made absolutely anywhere! You don’t need to live in the country to create beautiful and practical things for your home, revamp old furniture, declutter, cook delicious meals, find time to exercise your body and brain, enjoy company and conversation, dance, laugh, love . . .

You don’t need a rustic farmhouse kitchen to bake bread, turn fresh, seasonal ingredients into dishes of gorgeousness or fill old jars with homemade preserves.

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You don’t need a huge patch of land to grow a garden; in fact, you don’t even need a garden at all. It’s amazing what can be achieved in a few pots on a windowsill or balcony.

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My blog is about taking control of life and living it to the full, having so much more through having less, focusing on what is truly important, appreciating and enjoying the simple things that make each day special, putting experience over ‘stuff’, being kind to the environment and living a simple, gentle but utterly fulfilling life. It doesn’t matter where you call home. It’s nothing to do with location and everything to do with attitude. You can take it with you wherever you go. Now that’s a lovely thought.

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Sofa . . . so good

I’m so very excited about writing this blog that I just want to dive in and write and write and write – there is so much to share! However, there is no need to rush.  I must be patient and take my time; after all, time is one of the biggest and very best things we have ‘bought’ for ourselves by dropping out. We have time to do all that we need to do, all that we want to do and time just to be. Quite honestly, that is priceless.

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Morning dew on geraniums . . . it’s wonderful to have the time to notice and enjoy such a simple but beautiful thing.

So . . . I’ll let this blog develop slowly –  maturing as it goes like a good cheese or wine – and weave the hows, whys and wherefores of our simple life into tales of our daily living. There are so many incredible and inspirational blogs out there on a similar theme and I’ve been trying to work out where exactly we fit into the scheme of things. Are we frugal? In the dictionary definition ‘economical in use or expenditure; prudently saving or sparing; not wasteful’ then yes, we are . . . but not in a mean or tight way. We don’t spend much money but we don’t feel like we go without – quite  the opposite, in fact. Are we minimalists? According to Joshua Becker Becoming Minimalistminimalism is the intentional promotion of the things we most value and the removal of everything that distracts us from it – so yes, that’s us too, to a large extent. How about self-sufficient? Ironically, in terms of food production we are less self-sufficient than we have been in the past, mainly because we have decided against the tie of livestock, for the time being at least. That said, the bulk of our fruit and vegetables comes from the garden, we love to forage for wild foods and although we buy other foods, every meal and all our bread is made from scratch.  It’s not just about food, either. We are self-sufficient in other essentials such as fuel for the stove and if I’m allowed to count it, labour – we’re practical people and can turn our hands to most things so we don’t pay other people to do things we can do ourselves.

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Growing, harvesting, cooking and eating vegetables and fruit from the garden is an important and wonderful part of our life.

In May 2016, we moved ourselves from the UK to northern Spain with only the possessions we could fit into a hired transit van, car and two trailers. Our new home is in a stunning mountain location but that is pretty much all that could be said for it at the time. On good days, it was an ‘ interesting project’ but a more realistic evaluation would be ‘complete hovel’! However, we could see there was plenty of potential to transform it into a comfortable, cosy, happy home: all it required was a modest amount of expenditure and several years of work. We knew that the house needed a new roof so we had budgeted for that and put the money aside to pay local builders – we certainly weren’t going to tackle that job ourselves! The rest, though, has been down to us and we are paying for the materials as we go along out of our normal monthly fund which proves just what is possible on a meagre income.

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Home, sweet home: a project in waiting.

Anyway, after months of work this week we finally reached an exciting milestone: Return of the Sofa.  Our house is small and we have decided to create a cabin-style feel to the interior by having one open kitchen / living space with a bedroom and bathroom off. With the flooring down and decorating done (just a few fiddly finishing bits and pieces left to do) we rescued our sofa from the barn where it has spent many months wrapped in tarpaulin and introduced it to its new home. We bought the sofa roughly twelve years ago to sit at one end of our kitchen. As a family, we have always enjoyed what I would call ‘sociable’ cooking: no individual slaving away in the kitchen on their own to cook dinner, but all hands on deck whether to help, hinder or simply keep the cook company. Our resident teenagers and their friends loved that sofa and many happy evenings have been spent on it, chatting, laughing and playing music. What a state the poor thing was in when we unwrapped it; it has certainly had a life!

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Battered, faded and slightly mouse-nibbled . . . it’s good to have our sofa back again!

Now I realise there are many people out there who would have got rid of something so tatty many years ago and certainly wouldn’t have dragged it all the way to Spain . . . but this is where our frugal approach is so valuable, because in my eyes all it needed was a bit of TLC. A good vacuuming went a long way to cleaning it up but there’s not a lot to do about the obvious wear and tear except cover it.

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This is definitely beyond repair with needle and thread . . . 

First, a heavy cotton throw (which we have had for so long I can’t even remember where it came from), freshly washed and dried in the sunshine, then the ‘Coast’ ripple blanket I had spent many happy weeks making over the summer just for this purpose. Ta dah!

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Okay, I have no idea what’s hot and happening in the world of sofa fashion right now and I suspect it’s not this . . . but who cares? It’s clean, bright, slightly quirky, warm and incredibly comfy, so why replace it? Put it this way, the cost of a new one would pay our shopping bill for several months: that’s why we live how we do!

Back to the sociable cooking and seventeen years ago we bought a couple of breakfast bar chairs (not sure if that’s the right term) to accommodate extra kitchen dwellers at worktop height. After much use the original bottle green paint had all but rubbed away so I have had a happy time in the sunshine this week giving them a facelift with some spare eau-de-nil eggshell paint I’ve been using on the doors. Here’s the first one installed, looking good as new.

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Looking around the furniture in our living area, I suddenly realised that the sofa is actually the newest thing there; we’ve had everything else for longer. Pine desk – 15 years; cane comfy chairs – 17 years; bookcase –  20 years; coffee table- 20 years; butcher’s block – 23 years; kitchen table and chairs – 25 years. We haven’t bothered to spend money updating because we’re bored or our ‘stuff’ is unfashionable – it’s functional, we’re happy with it so why change? I actually love the history in our kitchen table, not just all the happy meals we’ve shared around it with family and friends but all the little doodlings you can see in the right light, left in the soft pine by our children busy with their artwork, homework or whatever. I studied for my degree at that table and sewed my daughter’s wedding dress on it, too. So many stories, so much love.

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Our kitchen table, my trusty workbench: I have spent more hours doing crafty things on it than eating, I am sure!

Believe it or not, we have other pieces of furniture that have done even longer service than the table, the most noteworthy being this chest of drawers currently squeezed into a temporary space in the kitchen.

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We bought this almost 30 years ago from a secondhand shop (junk, not antiques!) when we were setting up home and desperately needed something for storage. Junk it was, too; a rather nasty thing, covered in badly chipped  brown varnish and sporting ugly handles. The beauty of it to my eye was those lovely deep drawers, just right for bedding and towels. Looking at the worn parts now, I can see I must have painted it yellow at some point; I certainly don’t remember that but then it was a long time ago! At a slightly later date, I set to and gave it a new look with spare bits of cream and blue paint, then had a very happy time with stencils. Along with a few other temporarily placed bits and pieces, this chest will move out of the kitchen to a new spot once the renovation is complete. With that paint so chipped, flaking and grubby beyond cleaning, it really is time for another facelift and there’s a job I shall relish! The true irony – and the reason I’m sharing this tale – is that of all the pieces of furniture we’ve ever had, this one has drawn more compliments and happy comments than anything else. In fact, only recently a Spanish friend visited and made a beeline straight to it – she loves restoring furniture and this sort of thing is right up her street. It just goes to show that you don’t need to spend a fortune or be constantly changing and replacing the things around you in order to be comfortable or happy. Cherish the old and worn: they hold the story of your life and that’s a thing far more precious than fashion.

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The only thing regularly changed in our home are fresh flowers from the garden. The vase was a wedding gift, so we’ve had that for 32 years – blimey!

 

Daydreams

Why write this blog? Well, I’ve been inspired by the people – so many people – who, sighing wistfully, have said they wish they could do what we have done. My response is always the same: so why can’t you? What is stopping you from following your dream? *

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If you don’t follow a dream then it remains just that, an abstract idea of what life could have been. We seem to be programmed to cast doubt on some of our finest hopes, ideas and aspirations. How powerful are can’t, shouldn’t, musn’t, don’t and couldn’t on the tongues of others and in the chatter of our own minds? How many wonderful experiences have been lost to the crushing negativity of doubt and disbelief? How much better is it to fail trying than never to try at all? How sad to look back over a life full of if onlys . . .

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That said, of course, pursuing any dream does require a decent dose of common sense. Modern life comes with a whole rack of commitments, responsibilities and expectations which we can’t just abandon overnight. The most common reply to the question * above is lack of money. No surprise there; lovely though it would be (I think, anyway) to live in a world of sharing and barter, the bottom line is we need enough funds to live on. How much ‘enough’ amounts to is down to individual wants and needs but to us it means enough monthly income to cover our bills plus a slush fund for emergencies; we haven’t bowed out of modern life completely and things happen – who knows when the car might break down, for instance? However, our ‘enough’ is just that; in fact, our whole life change was based on the understanding that enough is enough. When our children left home, we could both have carried on working full-time; we wouldn’t have seen much of each other and we would have rattled around a house full of empty rooms, but we would have had more money than we could ever spend . . . so what was the point? We now live on an income well below the current British median disposable income figure and we still have more money than we can spend . . . as well as a much smaller, cosier home and all the time in the world to be together and live life to the full. (As a quick aside – we could have done this in the UK but decided we’d like a bit of an adventure, so we are currently living in the beautiful principality of Asturias, in northern Spain.)

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I am not a financial expert and I have no intention of handing out advice about money (apart from occasionally sharing some of the ways in which we manage to save it). I am not going to preach, either; how people live their lives is up to them and what we are doing wouldn’t be everyone’s cup of tea. If you don’t agree with what I say, then that’s fine – we’ll agree to differ! What I hope to do is present a gentle plea for simple living and to share the many benefits it can bring. You don’t have to be radical and pack in work, sell your property, move abroad, give up all the things you love to have and do to enjoy a simpler lifestyle . . . but it’s amazing what huge differences just small changes can make to lives that are too frantic, too busy or too stressful. If you dream of a simpler life, then please believe you can make it happen. Your dream might seem small and insignificant, but the point is, it’s your dream. Don’t let it get away!

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