Perfect Planning

The photos in this post are some I have taken over the last couple of weeks. I hope you enjoy their simple seasonal beauty.

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It’s funny the things I miss sometimes. We have hardly any post here: being totally paperless is great for the environment but I do miss a pile of old envelopes for making lists on! I like lists, I like lists of lists and above all, I love a good plan.

If you are considering making some changes to your life in order to simplify your lifestyle or give you more time to do the things you want to then starting with a Grand Plan is vitally important. We didn’t suddenly wake up one morning, pack a van and disappear; our decision to downsize and drop out was made years ago and involved some very careful planning and decision-making in order to make it happen. Even if the change you are looking for is relatively small – say, making time to sit down in peace and quiet once a day, getting rid of unwanted clutter or learning to cook simple but delicious meals -then a plan is still a helpful and powerful tool. The British armed forces have a saying known as the Seven Ps: proper prior planning  prevents piss-poor performance. Love it or loathe it, it contains a lot of truth; the better you can make your life plan, the greater chance you will have of realising your goals. So, here are my tips in how to get started.

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You will need pens or pencils and paper – almost certainly something bigger than the back of an envelope! Actually, I always find the bigger the better as it helps me to really focus; we use a flipchart sheet and marker pens in different colours which can be useful for grouping or separating ideas.

Start with your ultimate goal as the title. Remember, this is your dream and only you can make it happen. Making your plan is so exciting because it’s the first step in moving from an abstract idea to something more concrete. Seeing it written down starts to make it feel possible and real. Go on, smile – this really could happen!

You know that awful job interview question, ‘So where do you see yourself in five years’ time?’ Well, it’s so much more fun when you are asking yourself. Timescale is very important: how long do you realistically believe it will take to achieve your goal? Write it down, underline it, circle it . . . that’s what you will be working towards.

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Now split your page in half. On one side, make two simple but comprehensive lists of the pros and cons of making your life change. Be honest here; it’s less painful to ignore the cons but they are important factors in the equation. In the same way, don’t ignore what might seem abstract or even daft ideas in the pros list: being happier or less tired or healthier are important – in fact, possibly just the very reasons behind wanting to make the changes in your life.

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Next, assign everything in your two lists a weighting to show their relative importance to you. This can be a bit tricky so take your time and again, be honest and realistic. It might be more attractive to focus on the good bits but things like financial concerns can’t be ignored; it’s crucially important not to risk financial disaster or the loss of your home. Being brutally honest at this stage could save a lot of heartache later on. What you should see developing is a clear set of reasons why you should pursue your dream and a list of the possible negative factors that could affect your decision.

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On the other half of your page, write down everything you would need to do in order to achieve your goal. What goes here will depend entirely on you, your situation and your dream. If finding a few minutes in the morning to read or exercise before going to work is your aim, then organising clothes and lunchbox the evening before and setting the alarm for an earlier time may be pretty much all you need to do; if you plan to sell everything and travel the world in a camper van, then your list is likely to be a fair bit longer! That’s fine – it’s your list and it doesn’t matter how short or long it turns out to be. Don’t forget to add any research that you might need to carry out (we spent a lot of time looking into the cost of living, tax implications and health care insurance abroad) or any new skills you want to acquire (in our case, basic Spanish so we factored in some evening classes before we moved).  What you should find is that pretty much everything in the end will come down to three things: time, money and effort. Once your list is complete, draw lines or arrows to indicate dependencies and make connections as this will help when it comes to sorting out order and timescale. So for instance, we knew that we couldn’t sell our home or move abroad before our youngest child had left home, but it would be possible for one of us to shift from full-time to part-time work several years before then.

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At this point, stop! You’ve worked hard and your head is probably whirling like a squirrel in a cage with the excitement and trepidation of it all. Walk away from your plan and go and do something else: have a walk or run in the fresh air, put the kettle on, watch a film . . .  whatever helps you to relax. Leave your plan in a place where you can clearly see it for several days (that’s the beauty of working on big paper, it’s very visible); visit it often, look over what you’ve written, think and reflect. Is there anything missing or new that you’ve thought of? Add it. Do some things now seem irrelevant or unnecessary? Cross them out. On reflection, could you do things differently or change your timescale? Adjust your ideas.

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Now comes the really exciting bit: creating your Grand Plan! Actually, it’s quite simple, as all you need to do is write a chronological list of everything that needs to happen within your chosen timescale. I like to make a written numbered list whilst Roger prefers to create nifty spreadsheets on the computer. It’s your plan, so do exactly what works for you. The important point to remember in the coming weeks, months or years is that your Grand Plan is a work in progress and as such it is designed to be flexible, not set in stone. If your ideas change as you go along or things take longer than expected to happen or lead in unexpected directions, that’s fine – it’s all part of the process. Even if your plan doesn’t come to fruition or you have to end up altering it or abandoning it in favour of other things, treat it as an interesting exercise and experience. After all, the very fact that you wanted to make it in the first place was a brave and adventurous step in trying to change your life for the better . . . and that’s an amazing and ultimately rewarding thing to do.

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