Sofa . . . so good

I’m so very excited about writing this blog that I just want to dive in and write and write and write – there is so much to share! However, there is no need to rush.  I must be patient and take my time; after all, time is one of the biggest and very best things we have ‘bought’ for ourselves by dropping out. We have time to do all that we need to do, all that we want to do and time just to be. Quite honestly, that is priceless.

PICT0105
Morning dew on geraniums . . . it’s wonderful to have the time to notice and enjoy such a simple but beautiful thing.

So . . . I’ll let this blog develop slowly –  maturing as it goes like a good cheese or wine – and weave the hows, whys and wherefores of our simple life into tales of our daily living. There are so many incredible and inspirational blogs out there on a similar theme and I’ve been trying to work out where exactly we fit into the scheme of things. Are we frugal? In the dictionary definition ‘economical in use or expenditure; prudently saving or sparing; not wasteful’ then yes, we are . . . but not in a mean or tight way. We don’t spend much money but we don’t feel like we go without – quite  the opposite, in fact. Are we minimalists? According to Joshua Becker Becoming Minimalistminimalism is the intentional promotion of the things we most value and the removal of everything that distracts us from it – so yes, that’s us too, to a large extent. How about self-sufficient? Ironically, in terms of food production we are less self-sufficient than we have been in the past, mainly because we have decided against the tie of livestock, for the time being at least. That said, the bulk of our fruit and vegetables comes from the garden, we love to forage for wild foods and although we buy other foods, every meal and all our bread is made from scratch.  It’s not just about food, either. We are self-sufficient in other essentials such as fuel for the stove and if I’m allowed to count it, labour – we’re practical people and can turn our hands to most things so we don’t pay other people to do things we can do ourselves.

PICT0620
Growing, harvesting, cooking and eating vegetables and fruit from the garden is an important and wonderful part of our life.

In May 2016, we moved ourselves from the UK to northern Spain with only the possessions we could fit into a hired transit van, car and two trailers. Our new home is in a stunning mountain location but that is pretty much all that could be said for it at the time. On good days, it was an ‘ interesting project’ but a more realistic evaluation would be ‘complete hovel’! However, we could see there was plenty of potential to transform it into a comfortable, cosy, happy home: all it required was a modest amount of expenditure and several years of work. We knew that the house needed a new roof so we had budgeted for that and put the money aside to pay local builders – we certainly weren’t going to tackle that job ourselves! The rest, though, has been down to us and we are paying for the materials as we go along out of our normal monthly fund which proves just what is possible on a meagre income.

DSCF7313
Home, sweet home: a project in waiting.

Anyway, after months of work this week we finally reached an exciting milestone: Return of the Sofa.  Our house is small and we have decided to create a cabin-style feel to the interior by having one open kitchen / living space with a bedroom and bathroom off. With the flooring down and decorating done (just a few fiddly finishing bits and pieces left to do) we rescued our sofa from the barn where it has spent many months wrapped in tarpaulin and introduced it to its new home. We bought the sofa roughly twelve years ago to sit at one end of our kitchen. As a family, we have always enjoyed what I would call ‘sociable’ cooking: no individual slaving away in the kitchen on their own to cook dinner, but all hands on deck whether to help, hinder or simply keep the cook company. Our resident teenagers and their friends loved that sofa and many happy evenings have been spent on it, chatting, laughing and playing music. What a state the poor thing was in when we unwrapped it; it has certainly had a life!

PICT0041
Battered, faded and slightly mouse-nibbled . . . it’s good to have our sofa back again!

Now I realise there are many people out there who would have got rid of something so tatty many years ago and certainly wouldn’t have dragged it all the way to Spain . . . but this is where our frugal approach is so valuable, because in my eyes all it needed was a bit of TLC. A good vacuuming went a long way to cleaning it up but there’s not a lot to do about the obvious wear and tear except cover it.

PICT0044
This is definitely beyond repair with needle and thread . . . 

First, a heavy cotton throw (which we have had for so long I can’t even remember where it came from), freshly washed and dried in the sunshine, then the ‘Coast’ ripple blanket I had spent many happy weeks making over the summer just for this purpose. Ta dah!

PICT0131

Okay, I have no idea what’s hot and happening in the world of sofa fashion right now and I suspect it’s not this . . . but who cares? It’s clean, bright, slightly quirky, warm and incredibly comfy, so why replace it? Put it this way, the cost of a new one would pay our shopping bill for several months: that’s why we live how we do!

Back to the sociable cooking and seventeen years ago we bought a couple of breakfast bar chairs (not sure if that’s the right term) to accommodate extra kitchen dwellers at worktop height. After much use the original bottle green paint had all but rubbed away so I have had a happy time in the sunshine this week giving them a facelift with some spare eau-de-nil eggshell paint I’ve been using on the doors. Here’s the first one installed, looking good as new.

PICT0054

Looking around the furniture in our living area, I suddenly realised that the sofa is actually the newest thing there; we’ve had everything else for longer. Pine desk – 15 years; cane comfy chairs – 17 years; bookcase –  20 years; coffee table- 20 years; butcher’s block – 23 years; kitchen table and chairs – 25 years. We haven’t bothered to spend money updating because we’re bored or our ‘stuff’ is unfashionable – it’s functional, we’re happy with it so why change? I actually love the history in our kitchen table, not just all the happy meals we’ve shared around it with family and friends but all the little doodlings you can see in the right light, left in the soft pine by our children busy with their artwork, homework or whatever. I studied for my degree at that table and sewed my daughter’s wedding dress on it, too. So many stories, so much love.

PICT0482
Our kitchen table, my trusty workbench: I have spent more hours doing crafty things on it than eating, I am sure!

Believe it or not, we have other pieces of furniture that have done even longer service than the table, the most noteworthy being this chest of drawers currently squeezed into a temporary space in the kitchen.

PICT0144

We bought this almost 30 years ago from a secondhand shop (junk, not antiques!) when we were setting up home and desperately needed something for storage. Junk it was, too; a rather nasty thing, covered in badly chipped  brown varnish and sporting ugly handles. The beauty of it to my eye was those lovely deep drawers, just right for bedding and towels. Looking at the worn parts now, I can see I must have painted it yellow at some point; I certainly don’t remember that but then it was a long time ago! At a slightly later date, I set to and gave it a new look with spare bits of cream and blue paint, then had a very happy time with stencils. Along with a few other temporarily placed bits and pieces, this chest will move out of the kitchen to a new spot once the renovation is complete. With that paint so chipped, flaking and grubby beyond cleaning, it really is time for another facelift and there’s a job I shall relish! The true irony – and the reason I’m sharing this tale – is that of all the pieces of furniture we’ve ever had, this one has drawn more compliments and happy comments than anything else. In fact, only recently a Spanish friend visited and made a beeline straight to it – she loves restoring furniture and this sort of thing is right up her street. It just goes to show that you don’t need to spend a fortune or be constantly changing and replacing the things around you in order to be comfortable or happy. Cherish the old and worn: they hold the story of your life and that’s a thing far more precious than fashion.

PICT0133
The only thing regularly changed in our home are fresh flowers from the garden. The vase was a wedding gift, so we’ve had that for 32 years – blimey!

 

2 thoughts on “Sofa . . . so good

  1. Yes, it’s always the things that we’ve found or made (or that have been made for us by others) that make a home super cosy. A lot of nice houses just seem sterile to me. It’s got to be cosy! Most of our furniture is from the street (great stuff left on the pavements of Edinburgh), from charity shops and second-hand shops too. The family who had the cottage before us made simple furniture themselves (bookshelves, in-built cupboard and storage chests, simple desks, window seats) and that’s probably what we’d do now. Really customise the space and just paint things in lovely colours. I love your Coast throw. How can that not be the latest in sofa fashion?

    Like

    1. There is something so lovely about old bits and pieces and you’re right, a home needs to be cosy and personal and not like something out of a glossy magazine. Roger spent the morning making a wine rack from spare bits of wood up the side of the stove, not on our original kitchen plan but should keep the Rioja lovely and warm! 🙂

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s